12 Study Tips that will Boost your Examination Results in 2019…

GoConqr write an interesting piece about study and study skills that I’d like to share with you. Source @ end of blog. They talk about 12 areas that I hope will benefit you as you commence study proper, whether you are in Secondary or Third Level Education.

  1. Set Study Goals
  2. Make a Study Plan
  3. Take Regular Study Breaks
  4. Embrace New Technologies
  5. Test Yourself
  6. Find a Healthy Balance
  7. Be Positive
  8. Collaborate with Study Partners
  9. Turn lessons into stories
  10. Establish a Study Routine
  11. Mark Small Challenges
  12. Consult teachers

Set Study Goals

There is lots of credible research suggesting that goal setting can be used as part of a strategy to help people successfully effect positive changes in their lives, so never underestimate the power of identifying to yourself the things you want to achieve. Just make sure to ask yourself some key questions: Am I setting realistic goals? Will I need to work harder to achieve those goals? If you’re happy with the goals you’ve set then you should aim to develop your study plan for the year ahead with your goals in mind.

Make a Study Plan

Time is precious. Nobody is more aware of this than the poor student who hasn’t studied a thing until the night before an exam. By then, of course, it’s too late. The key to breaking the cycle of cramming for tests is to think ahead and make a study plan. Not only will this help you get organised and make the most of your time, it’ll also put your mind at ease and eliminate that nasty feeling you get when you walk into an exam knowing that you’re not at all prepared.

Take Regular Study Breaks

It’s important to realize that you can’t maintain an optimum level of concentration without giving yourself some time to recover from the work you’ve put in. This can take the form of a ten-minute walk, a trip to the gym, having a chat with a friend or simply fixing yourself a hot drink. If it feels like procrastination, then rest assured that it’s not: taking regular short breaks not only help improve your focus, they can boost your productivity too.

Embrace New Technologies

Studying no longer means jotting things down with a pen on a scrap of paper. The old handwritten method still has its place of course, it’s just that now there are more options for personalising study that ever before. Whether it’s through online tools, social media, blogs, videos or mobile apps, learning has become more fluid and user-centred.

Test Yourself

It’s a strange thing, but sometimes simply entering an exam environment is enough to make you forget some of the things you’ve learned. The solution is to mentally prepare for the pressure of having to remember key dates, facts, names, formulas and so on. Testing yourself with regular quizzes is a great way of doing this. And don’t worry of you don’t perform brilliantly at first – the more you practice, the better you’ll become.

Find a Healthy Balance

Take this opportunity to evaluate yourself both physically and mentally. Is your engine running on low? Instead of  complaining “I never get enough sleep” or “I’m eating too much convenience food” take control and do something about it! Make the change and see how it positively affects your attitude and study routine. This should motivate you to maintain a healthy balance in the future.

Be Positive

Your attitude has a big impact on the level of study that you get done and the effectiveness of your learning process. If you keep saying that you can’t do it and won’t commit to the idea of learning, attempting to study is only likely to become more difficult. Instead, focus your mind on positive outcomes and on how you can use your own individual strengths to achieve them. When you think positively, the reward centers in your brain show greater activity, thereby making you feel less anxious and more open to new study tips.

Collaborate with Study Partners

At this stage of the school year, you should know your classmates pretty well. This is a good point in time to select a couple of study partners who you know you work well with and are motivated to achieve good grades also. Don’t worry if you can’t meet up too often, you can use online tools to communicate and share study notes with one another.

Turn lessons into stories

Everybody likes to read or listen to a good story, and with good reason – not only do stories entertain us, but they also help us to understand and memorize key details too. You can apply this to your studies by weaving important details or facts into a story – the more outlandish and ridiculous you can make it, the better.

Establish a Study Routine

Your study routine is comprised of more than planning what to learn and when. One of the main concerns is your study environment. Find a place to study that is quiet and with few distractions. Alternatively, you could also try switching it up by sitting in a different place in your school library every day and seeing how this works for you.

Mark Small Challenges

When you have to face very long and dense subjects, you can set small challenges to keep your spirits high; a good way to focus on the day-to-day and find motivations while you study. According to scientific analysis, the more motivated and excited we are, the better our brain performs.

Consult teachers

Any questions you have about the exam, the best you can do is go to the Teacher / Lecturer of the subject and expose your doubts. Not only is the person best suited to solve your questions, but your initiative will be well received and you’ll show good attitude by demonstrating that you’re interested in his subject.

There really aren’t any hard and fast rules to play by when it comes to the best times for studying or how long you should work for.

Everybody is different, so the best way to establish a routine is to try different things and see what works best for you, then modify your routine for maximum learning effectiveness.

Source: goconqr.com

Summer Jobs…

Whether you have had to sit major state examinations or third level examinations, the 1st June or the 1st July mark the official start of the summer holiday period for most if not all students. Two – three months i.e. eight to twelve weeks are available to you to source employment, get ‘world of work experience’ and I guess more importantly, make some pocket money for those summer weekends or for school / college next term. With Ireland experiencing its lowest employment rate for many years, sourcing employment shouldn’t be overly difficult. Where there’s a will, there’s a way!

Consider the following ideas:

• Who do you, your family members, relations and / or friends know in business that have direct or indirect business contacts to decisionmakers
• Do an EYK List i.re. Everyone You Know List
• Take a walk / drive around your area of residence, your town and / or nearest city, who are the major (indeed minor employers), what do they do, where do the need help, could you help them, do they employ young people like you
• Read your local newspaper’s business pages to see who’s recruiting
• Develop a CV that sells you to prospective employers, tailoring it accordingly around their business and how you can help them, outlining your relevant talents, skills and abilities

Working during your summer holidays and between school / college breaks has so many benefits that you may not see or realize now, but in the medium to long term, you will.

Some of these benefits include:

• Enhancing your time management skills
• Reporting to a manager or supervisor on what you are doing / have done
• Developing people skills
• Developing customer care and customer service skills
• Handling cash and financial transactions
• Work experience for your CV’s of the future
• Experiencing making and saving your own money
• Making new friends

So, don’t waste this summer, get out there and get a job…

And now the end is near……

With only a matter of weeks to go to the Leaving Certificate examinations, it is now time to transition from doing homework to full-time study. Indeed your teachers should have by now ceased giving homework and be focused on study, passed papers and particular areas of examination questions that might come up in the examinations.

When it comes to study, you should have by now summarised each chapter in each subject book that can be summarised into manageable study notes like a mind-map, pointer cards and / or note-pad. Studying from the actual books themselves is difficult as you are looking at and reading all of this information, trying to decipher what is core and key, and what part of it could be asked in an examination. If you haven’t already done this, then do it, it is not too late. You still have lots of time left to transfer the main subject chapter information that could be asked about in an exanimation into manageable study notes. This will make your study periods easier, more productive and indeed more enjoyable.

Speaking of study periods, how long should you be studying for as you head into the final furlong of this long 5-6 year school race?

There are many different theories of this from many experts. Some suggest 45 minute periods with a 15 minutes break, some say 60 minutes and so on. I guess it is really what works best for you. You should have some form of study plan / agenda that gives you some structure to your day and ensures that you are giving adequate, ample and the necessary time to each subject that require it. Whatever you choose, include break times, put the study plan on paper and stick to it.

 

Fail to plan, plan to fail…

 

 

study skills examination techniques

100 Days To Go…

With 100 days to go to the Leaving Certificate Examinations, you as a student are now feeling the pressure, feeling somewhat anxious and thinking how will I get through the next three months March, April and May. You’ve just had your last mid-term break (ever!) and it is time to once again and for one last time start studying and preparing for what is probably the most important examination you have to do in your life. So, how do you go about doing this, so that you don’t get overwhelmed, stay on track / focused and be the best you can be in June?

Consider the following:

  • Do a realistic, yet challenging Study Plan
  • Doing more study than Homework
  • Keeping August in your mind’s eye
  • Enjoying your last days in secondary school
  • Doing your best

Do a realistic, yet challenging Study Plan

Plan out the next 100 days on paper in the form of a Study Plan and put it over your study desk. Using 45-60 minutes of study periods and 15 minutes break times, see it as a working week i.e. clocking in and clocking out

Doing more study than Homework

The transition from doing homework to doing a study as your Teachers should be encouraging you to do as from now. Going back over your subject summaries and past papers should be your primary focus

Keeping August in your mind’s eye

Think of that day in the middle of August, when the results ‘come out’. Don’t be the person to be disappointed; be the person who is delighted with their results, looking forward to the CAO offers the following week.

Enjoying your last days in secondary school

Don’t forget to enjoy the last 100 days in secondary school. I know it is easy to say, however, when you are enjoying them, coupled with working hard, it will help the learning’s more stick in your mind.

Doing your best

At the end of the day, all you can do is your best and do try to give these 100 days your all, with no regrets. So shackles off, head down and be the best you can be…